EM Throwing Program powered by Driveline

Through our training and testing, EM works directly with DriveLine to continue the research, development and programming DriveLine has pioneered for pitchers and throwers everywhere.  We are proud to say that you can get your program, do your program and develop your program at all EM locations.

Throw Harder in 8 Weeks!

Driveline training systems are the most comprehensive and advanced approach to pitching development out there. If you’re looking for a program that creates healthy arms and velocity – look no further. My guys will always use their training systems.

-Nate Yeskie, Oregon State Pitching Coach, 2013 ABCA Pitching Coach of the Year

About the Program

EM’s Throwing Program powered by Driveline has changed the way baseball throwers think about training programs and protocols.  Here at EM, we work together with DriveLine to continue to improve the way throwers train and get better results.  As at DriveLine, we use technology to track performance increases, throwers motion, release point, velocity, horizontal and vertical break, extension and more.  In addition to the standard radar gun, we use other technology including 3d doppler FlightScope, High Speed Cameras, Video Analysis and are committed to use our 10 years of strength and conditioning throwers to analyze and prescribe the training program that works in harmony with your in-season and out of season throwing activity.

GET STARTED BUTTONTraining and Staff

EM’s Training staff for the DriveLine Program includes Certified Strength and Conditioning Coaches, Pitching Experts and Physical Therapists that don’t ‘tell you how to pitch’… we assist you in finding your most efficient throwing motion and arm slot.  We reinforce your deficiencies and bolster your strong suits.  Our goal is the same as yours … Throw Harder, Get Stronger and Stay Healthy.form and function trevor

Testing (see ‘Testing with FlightScope’ below)

Your evaluation tests every facet of your throwing and athletic baseline to see how your body is prepared for the rigors of training and pitching including strength, explosiveness, shoulder stability and flexibility, and is conducted by Pitching Experts, Certified Trainers and Physical Therapists.  We search for areas we can improve to help you fire on all cylinders and have your body work in unison.  We also test your pitching baseline ‘by pitch type’ including Pitch Velocity, Spin Rate, Vertical Break, Horizontal Break, Horizontal Movement, Vertical Movement, Vertical and Horizontal Release, Spin Axis, Extension, Release Point – seems like a lot, but the goal is deception and to make every pitch look the same coming out of your hand – this edge is the difference between a hit and a whiff.  This proprietary testing procedure is limited to a few testing facilities in the United States and throughout the world.  The information if invaluable to you as a pitcher as you progress and as a tool to monitor and shape your success as a pitcher.

Maintenance

Off season is time to get aggressive, but in-season holds another key to constant improvement, recovery cycles, stability and injury detection and prevention.  We help you through a long season of throwing and allow you to recover faster and perform to your potential every time on the field or the mound.

To Start the DriveLine Program please talk with Ed Halstead 888-890-0008 EXT 704.

GET STARTED BUTTONChris Devenski HB Flyer

Testing with FlightScope

1. Pitch Velocity (VELO)/Release Speed = Speed of pitch when it leaves the pitcher’s hand

2. Spin Rate (SR) = How fast the ball is spinning as it leaves the pitcher’s hand, reported in the number of times the pitched ball would spin per minute (“revolutions per minute” or “rpm”)

3. Vertical Break = Distance between where the pitch actually crosses the front of home plate height-wise, and where it would have crossed home plate height-wise if had it traveled in a perfectly straight line from release, completely unaffected by gravity. Note: This number will be quite large for pitches released with a positive vertical release angle.

4. Horizontal Break = Distance between where the pitch actually crosses the front of home plate sidewise, and where it would have crossed home plate side-wise if had it traveled in a perfectly straight line from release. A positive number means the break was to the right from the pitcher’s perspective, while a negative number means the break was to the left from the pitcher’s perspective.

5. Vertical Movement (pfx_z) = The vertical (up-down) movement of the pitch during the last 40 feet before the front of home plate, as compared to a theoretical pitch thrown at the same speed with no spin-induced movementflightscope metrics pic 1

6. Horizontal Movement (pfx_x) = The horizontal (left-right) movement of the pitch during the last 40 feet before the front of home plate, as compared to a theoretical pitch thrown at the same speed with no spin-induced movement. Note: Unlike the Horizontal Break number above, this movement is from the batter’s perspective, meaning positive numbers break toward the 1B side, while negative numbers break to the 3B side

7. Vertical Release Angle/Pitch Launch Vertical = Initial vertical (up-down) direction of the ball when it leaves the pitcher’s hand, reported in degrees. A positive number means the ball is released upward, while a negative number means the ball is released downward

8. Horizontal Release Angle/Pitch Launch Horizontal = Initial horizontal (left-right) direction of the ball when it leaves the pitcher’s hand, reported in degrees. A positive number means the ball is released to the right from the pitcher’s perspective, while a negative number means the ball is released to the left from the pitcher’s perspective.

Vincent Velasquez HB Flyer9. Flight Time/Zone Time/Batter Reaction Time = Amount of time elapsed from pitcher’s release until it crosses the front of home plate.

10. Extension (EXT)/Release Distance = Distance from the rubber at which the pitcher releases the ball.

11. Pitch trajectory = 3D visualization and tracing of pitched ball flight path

12. Zone Command (Strike Zone Mapping) = Pitch location and sequence numbered

13. Tagged Pitch Type = Pitch classification (fastball, curveball, etc.) selected manually by system operator

14. Tagged Pitcher Set/Pitch Mechanics = Indication of whether a pitcher is throwing from the windup or stretch, as tagged by system operator

15. Tagged Pitch Result (see hit data)

16. Spin Axis = Direction the ball is spinning, reported in degrees of tilt. Note that:

a. A ball thrown with a spin axis of 0 has pure top spin. The top of the ball is moving away from the pitcher and the bottom of the ball is moving away from the batter. This is a classic “12-6” curveball. This kind of spin will cause the ball to drop more than gravity would cause alone.

b. A ball thrown with a spin axis of 180 has pure backspin and is a classic four seam fastball, with the top of the ball moving towards the pitcher and the bottom of the ball moving toward the batter. This kind of spin will cause the ball to drop less that gravity would cause alone.

c. A ball thrown with a spin axis of 90 is spinning squarely toward the left, from the pitcher’s perspective (and would create a break to the left), while a ball thrown with a spin axis of 270 is spinning squarely toward the right, from the pitcher’s perspective (and would create a break to the right).

17. Spin Tilt = Spin axis converted into clock time, rounded to the nearest 15 minutes. As a rule of thumb, the ball will break in the direction of the number on the clock face. For example:

a. 6:00 is perfect top spin (classic “12 – 6” curveball), causing the ball to break downMatt Andriese HB Flyer

b. 12:00 is perfect back spin (Four seam fastball, with no left-right movement), causing the ball to break upward relative to how it would have moved due to gravity alone – cutters are around 11:00 and sinkers are around 2:00 for a RHP, while cutters are around 1:00 and sinkers around 10:00 for a LHP.

c. 3:00 is a “Frisbee” spinning and breaking to the right, while 9:00 is a “Frisbee” spinning and breaking to the left.

18. Induced Vertical Break = Distance between where the pitch actually crosses the front of home plate height-wise, and where it would have crossed home plate height-wise if had it traveled in a perfectly straight line from release, but affected by gravity. Note: If this number is positive, the ball broke “upwards”, or in reality dropped less than it would have due to gravity alone – it does not necessarily mean that the ball actually rose.